Dealers: Human Trafficking Awaresness

The young woman lets out a terrified scream. “Leave me alone!” she cries. The harsh male response comes back “I’m going to teach you how to do your job!” How does love, the mafia, and friends and family combine to leave a woman desperate, and a community torn apart?? This serial thriller that follows a family of women traders who get caught up in a mafia scandal and underground human trafficking ring. Produced in Portuguese for Mozambique and English for Zambian audiences,

IOMLogoweb

Theme music:

Dealers (English)

Troco ( Portuguese)

Trailer

Dealers (English)

Troco ( Portuguese)

Links to other CMFD work

Human trafficking awareness radio spots

Dealers is a 13-part action-packed serial radio drama exploring issues related to human trafficking. Created in Portuguese for Mozambique and English for Zambian audiences, each 20 minute episode was produced to high quality broadcast standard. Through drama and engaging storylines, the series raises awareness about human trafficking and related issues, as well as communicates specific knowledge and skills, such as how to recognise suspicious offers, and what resources are available to turn to for help.

Upbeat and original theme music, produced in English and Portuguese, accompanies the drama, and both complements the story and stands alone as a strong message for people seeking to migrate to be sure of what they're getting into before they leave home.

The Drama

The drama, which comes as a five disc box set, contains a fold-out media guide that provides radio presenters or community groups using the drama with ideas about how to take the issues further. The easy to follow guide gives presenters suggestions for questions to ask listeners or studio guests, as well as stories they can do that relate to the themes in each episode.

In Mozambique, CMFD worked with the Hopangalatana Cultural Company, a well-known Maputo-based theatre troupe that uses participatory theatre techniques to raise awareness of issues facing Mozambicans.

In Zambia, CMFD had the opportunity to work with some of the country's stars of screen, television and radio, including Mainza Chipenzi, Linah Zulu, Kangwa Chileshe and "Peaches" Mufungulwa.

To record the music for the theme songs, CMFD brought artists from Zambia and Maputo to our recording studio in Johannesburg. As with our actors, we had the opportunity to work with two very talented and well-known artists, Lily Tembo in Zambia and Anita Macuacua in Mozambique, who gave a haunting depth to the lyrics.


What exactly is Dealers/ Troco all about?

Actresses

For the IOM, CMFD is developed a 13-part serial radio drama to explore issues related to human trafficking, in Portuguese, for Mozambican and Zambian audiences. Each episode is 20 minutes in length, and  produced to a high quality broadcast standard. Through drama and engaging storylines, the series raises awareness about human trafficking and related issues, as well as communicate specific knowledge and skills, such as how to recognise suspicious offers, and what resources are available to turn to for help. The main story focuses on human trafficking, while related issues, identified in collaboration with IOM, were weaved into the story. To engage with presenters and encourage post-broadcast discussion, information and fact sheets designed specifically for radio presenters will be produced.

Why use drama to raise awareness?

Using radio drama and theatre for social change can be very effective, as messaging can be creatively woven into a strong, exciting story. Audiences engage with the issues through their emotional involvement in the story and the characters. By identifying with the characters and traveling alongside them as they face conflicts and make decisions, audiences are also forced to face those conflicts, and live through those decisions.

This idea comes from the social learning theory developed by Albert Bandura. This theory suggests that people learn by:

  • observing other people's behaviour and the consequances they experiences because of it;
  • rehearsing what would happen if they followed that behaviour;
  • trying it out and comparing their experience with other people's; and
  • confirming their belief in the new behaviour.

Communication strategies using drama also draw on participatory theatre and popular education models developed by Augusto Boal and Paulo Freire. By giving people the opportunity to consider behaviours or actions via fictional characters, it allows them to rehearse the behaviour or action in a safe, non-threatening environment giving them the confidence to enact that behaviour or action in the real world. In Boal’s participatory theatre model, audiences literally become “spect-actors,” first watching, then acting out poss ible solutions for a common problem, or dealing with difficult situations by trying new behaviours (from Boal's Theatre of the Oppressed, 1979).

What's the big deal about radio?

Though theatre and radio drama have very different reaches and advantages, they both have great mass appeal, especially in the African context. One of the advantages to radio is that it can reach a large number of people at once, whereas theatre must generally cater to a smaller audience. More importantly, radio relies on oral storytelling, thereby bypassing the need for basic literacy, allowing a message to be passed on in a much more creative way. Storytelling has strong roots in most African cultures, making drama, whether on radio or in theatre, very palatable media. Other benefits to using radio include:

  • It is low cost to produce relative to other mass media like television or film.
  • Since it does not rely on literacy, a wide range of the population can access it.
  • It allows for localisation of the issue, since information about local organisations, interviews with local individuals, etc can follow the drama.
  • Community radio in itself is largely participatory, and this can help draw listening communities into the issue. In rural areas especially, listening to the radio is often a family, group or community activity, and radio can make use of these existing listening groups to spark discussion and debate.

Why is this drama important?

In 2003, IOM's report Seduction, Sale and Slavery: Trafficking in Women and Children for Sexual Exploitation in Southern Africa identified Lesotho, Mozambique, Malawi, and a number of refugee-producing countries as key source countries for women and children trafficked to South Africa. With its history of southward migration flows, instability, porous borders, and weak institutions and structures, Southern Africa is fertile ground for irregular migration, and hosts a diverse range of migrant smuggling and human trafficking activities. The region's young women and children are especially vulnerable to the recruitment tactics of human traffickers because civil unrest and economic deprivation leave them with few opportunities at home, making migration to South Africa, the region's most prosperous country, a credible and appealing lure. Without appropriate language skills, a supportive social network, and laws and customs that she understands, the trafficked person feels isolated and disoriented, and it is this feeling of disorientation that makes her particularly vulnerable to exploitation. IOM has recognised that there is a need to raise awareness about human trafficking and issues that increase vulnerability of migrant women, to sexual abuse, and encourage people to take action.

How was Dealers/ Troco developed?

ZambiafocusgroupIn preparation for the development of Dealers/Troco, formative research was conducted that included interviews with 100 migrant people living in Johannesburg. This research was used to bring out sub-themes like xenophobia, harassment and corruption by police and immigration officials, as well as touch on the root causes of migration. Having first-hand interviews was integral to keeping the story rooted in real experience. The scriptwriters could trust that what they were writing would reflect real situations as they had the stories and experiences of migrant people as a base to work from.

The drama was workshopped in English with a team of scriptwriters, and later adapted and translated into Portuguese for Mozambique. Both the initial story outline and the completed scripts were sent to various stakeholders in Zambia, Mozambique and South Africa for feedback to ensure that the story and characters were applicable to both Zambia and Mozambique.

Careful adaptation was an important part of the development of Troco. CMFD chose to adapt the Dealers storyline rather than create a new story. It is relatively inexpensive to adapt a storyline to another country, thereby increasing the reach of the project without a great deal of additional expense. Producing an adapted drama is also a quicker process since most of the sound effects will be the same, with only a few changes or additions to localise the settings. However, key considerations had to be made to ensure the adaptation of Troco was successful.

  • CMFD needed to ensure the language was accurate, both in terms of translation as well as specific words and phrases, local proverbs and references.
  • The translator needed to have a thorough understanding of both languages so that English idiomatic expressions were not directly translated into a Portuguese phrase that made no sense.
  • The adaptation needed to consider cultural differences and changes to certain details were made accordingly. For example, Zambia is a transit country for trafficking from the Congo to South Africa, so in Dealers, one of the lead characters unknowingly assists in the trafficking of Congolese girl. Mozambique is not a transit country for Congolese, so for Troco this was changed to a girl being trafficked from a remote part of Mozambique through Maputo to South Africa.

CMFD held focus groups in Zambia and Mozambique before recording began to make sure the drama was appealing, exciting, and that the characters and situations reflected reality. Feedback from the focus groups was overwhelmingly positive, with participants saying that they enjoyed the story, and that it reminded them that even though you think it won’t happen to you, trafficking is real.

During the recording, the response from the actors involved was much the same. Interestingly, one of the actors in Zambia had recently been offered a lucrative-sounding job in Canada, and was considering taking it. After recording the drama, and discussing the job offer with other people on the team, she decided the offer was not worth the potential risk, and turned it down.

Though it is too early to make a definite judgment, this may be an indication of the effectiveness of this story, and of radio drama in general, to talk about human trafficking in a way that encourages people to really think about the issues.

The drama also includes an original theme song that both complements the story and stands alone as a strong message for people seeking to migrate to be sure of what they are getting into before they leave home.

Accompanying the drama is a media guide that will give radio presenters or community organisations the information they need to initiate discussion about the characters and the issues they face. Radio stations will be encouraged to have live phone-in discussions after each episode, and CMFD has set up a blog for the drama in both English and Portuguese. The blogs contain images, audio and information about both the project and human trafficking, and can be found at www.dealersradio.org and www.trocoradio.org.


Dealers/ Troco Storyline Summary
Lead and supporting characters are listed with their Zambian names first and corresponding Mozambican names second.
CHOLA/ ESPERANCA – 40, widow, cross-border trader. She is a strong and wise woman, knows everything about trading. Her husband was a good man, and a good husband, but he was also in the mafia and was recently assassinated. She does not know, and believes his death was an accident. The mafia has been watching her closely.

CHILESHE/ SHEILA – 18, Chola’s daughter. She is sweet and kind, and easily sees the good in people before the bad. She is just starting out in the trading business with her Mother. She makes mistakes sometimes, and as teenagers often are, can be very headstrong at times. She is in love with Masautso.

BWALYA/ SOFIA – 28, Chola’s sister-in-law. She also trades with Chola. She is a bit lazy and gossipy, and has only taken up trading because she needs the money. She would have been happy to marry a rich man and never work again. Despite this, she is a good-natured woman, and a good friend to Chola.

MASAUTSO/ JORGE – 22, long distance chicken bus conductor. He is in love with Chileshe. Both his parents have passed away of AIDS-related illnesses, and he is now the head of his household. In his struggle to make ends meet, he sometimes takes unknown packages across the border to seedy areas of other major cities for DAVID, a local mobster. Chola also helps him out when she can.

Supporting Characters

DAVID/ ANTONIO – Son of the mob boss, Brian Kaluba. He is a reluctant mobster, and hates the work, but feels loyalty to his father. He is not terribly threatening, but people fear him because of his family. He is also in love with Chileshe.

KASONDE/ CELITO – Trafficker and cousin to Bwalya. He has a lot of money, but it’s all dirty. He comes off as a good guy, but he doesn’t actually care much for other people.

PRISCILLA/ ELSA – Sex worker at the brothel. Originally a Lusaka street kid, she was trafficked to the brothel years ago. She has worked her way up to earning certain privileges, is the brothel owner’s current girlfriend, and acts as ‘mother hen’ to the other girls. She has been in contact with an outreach worker, ANGELA.

ANGELA/ ANGELA – Outreach worker for the IOM in inner city Joburg. She is passionate about her job and goes to great lengths to get trafficked girls out of the brothels and somewhere safe. Her husband, worried for her safety, is not always supportive.

The Basic Storyline

chefeantonioChola and Bwalya are cross-border traders. Chola’s husband Gallagun (Bwalya’s brother), died 3 months back in a traffic accident, and so to make ends meet, Chola has started taking her daughter Chileshe on trading trips. Chileshe hates trading, but doesn’t mind the extra time she now gets to spend with her boyfriend Masautso, who is the conductor on the bus they usually take across the border.

What they don’t know, however, is that their family holds a secret. Gallagun was involved with the mafia running stolen cars to be fixed up and resold. He was not accidentally killed, but murdered by the mafia for running away with $30 000 cash. The mafia have been unable to locate the cash, but suspect it may still be hidden somewhere with Chola, so they have been watching the family, and have asked the son of the mob boss, David, to get the money back. David is happy to keep such a close eye as he is secretly in love with Chileshe, though he loathes mafia work and is unable to be the heartless, violent person it requires.

Meanwhile, Chola has found the money in a grubby old bag, but hasn’t told anyone about it. She doesn’t know how it got in her house, and has decided it would be best kept with Kasonde, Bwalya’s cousin, since he is already a rich man, and wouldn’t be curious about an old trader woman’s bags.

What Kasonde is interested in is Chileshe. Kasonde is also involved with the mob, and regularly trafficks young women into South Africa. After meeting Chileshe – when Chola brings her to Kasonde’s to drop the mysterious bag – he offers her a job in a dress shop in Johannesburg. He is very charming and hard to refuse.

Masautso, Chileshe’s boyfriend, is also the head of his household. His parents passed away from AIDS-related illnesses and he is in charge of his younger brothers and sister. His youngest brother, Mwila, is sick. Masautso has taken the child to a traditional healer, but Mwila’s cough keeps getting worse. Masautso is forced to ask Chola for money to go for another treatment. After some hesitation, she gives him some money from the grubby bag.

chefeantonio After a suspicious visit from David, Chola begins to have trouble with the mafia. She is being followed, her house gets broken into, and David seems to be turning up everywhere, especially near Chileshe. Conversations with both her neighbour Jack and David are leading her to suspect her husband was not the honest man she thought he was. She fears for her daughter’s safety and decides she should take Kasonde up on his offer to get Chileshe a job in Joburg.

After a sad farewell with Masautso, Chileshe leaves for the big city. David tells Chola the whole truth about her husband in an attempt to get the money back without resorting to violence. He threatens her, but she doesn’t give in.
Masautso is forced to take Mwila to the hospital when the second treatment from the healer doesn’t work. The boy is diagnosed with advanced TB and must stay at the hospital for some time. Masautso is very stressed, knowing he will need more money now. He is forced to do something he hates doing – smuggling small packages of drugs across the border for David. He doesn’t want to do it, but it’s the only way he can make money quickly.

Jack, Chola’s neighbour, is a builder. His wife is expecting their firstborn any day and he wants to buy her a cellphone. However, he is an honest man and refuses to buy a stolen phone, even though it’s much cheaper. While he is working one day, a man approaches him. He compliments him on his skills and tells him about a hospital project in Johannesburg. He needs builders like Jack, and would pay him a very good salary, but he needs an answer now so he can arrange all the papers. Jack agrees to go.

Kasonde has not taken Chileshe to work in a dress shop. He has taken her to a brothel where she is forced to sell her body. She tries to escape, but gets caught. One of the guards beats her and rapes her, saying he’s teaching her a lesson. One of the other girls, Priscilla, takes pity on her. Priscilla was trafficked too, but got out some time back. She eventually was drawn back to sex work because of the money she could get. She has contact with a social worker, Angela, who first helped her escape.
David and the goon his father pinned him with are still trying to get the money from Chola. She comes home one evening to find her house burned and everything in it destroyed. Bwalya arranges for her to stay with Kasonde.

David comes to Masautso with another ‘parcel’ to deliver. This time, the parcel is a women from the DRC (note: in Troco she is from Northern Mozambique). David says she’s a family friend and has a job in Joburg. All he wants is for Masautso to take the girl as far as the border. After some hesitation, Masautso agrees. At the border he has some trouble with immigration officials, but fortunately David gave him bribe money, so he gets through. On his way he sees Kasonde taking a fancy new car across into Zambia.

Jack goes to South Africa. Unfortunately, he never reaches his promised destination. The bus he is on stops at a farm. Jack doesn’t understand what the farm owner is saying to him, but he knows he is not where he is supposed to be. He has been sold into farm labour, and has no way of contacting his family.

Kasonde, thinking he has a buddy in David since they both work for the mob, tells David about trafficking Chileshe and about Chola staying with him. To him it’s a joke. David, who is in love with Chileshe, is horrified and tells Chola. David no longer cares about the money, he just wants to see Chileshe back safe.

Chola decides to go to Joburg to find her daughter. Bwalya catches Kasonde in a lie, and decides to join Chola. Cholafocus group leaves her money with Masautso and on the way to the bus is picked up by the mob, who are tired of waiting for David to act. She is tortured, but tells them nothing. David steps in and saves her, helping her escape the mob hideout, but he is caught in the act, and murdered by a power-hungry goon desperate to impress the boss

In Joburg, the two women encounter xenophobic police and an unfriendly city. Fortunately, a sympathetic cop takes them to Angela, who has been in contact with Priscilla. She locates Chileshe, and with Priscilla’s help, makes a plan to get Chileshe out.

Priscilla takes Chileshe with her to a party at a rich man’s house (the man is a regular client and often asks for several girls for his parties), and helps her sneak out the bathroom window. Chileshe wants Priscilla to come, but she refuses. When she gets back to the brothel, she is severely beaten for helping Chileshe escape. Matola, another girl who had been jealous of Chileshe’s friendship with Priscilla, and who told the brothel owner Priscilla was helping Chileshe, realizes how horrible she was acting, and now feels she needs to get out.

Back at home, both Kasonde and Masautso are being questioned by the mob about the money. Since Kasonde is that last person to admit seeing the bag (which he did not know was full of cash until now) he is told to get the money, no matter how he has to make it. He now has to resort to every scheme he can to make up the cash quickly. Eventually, he is arrested.

Chileshe is back home, and quiet about her experience. She is damaged and depressed. Masautso is trying to be there for her, to be intimate, but she won’t let him. Masautso’s little brother is recovering well. He also tells them about Kasonde’s arrest and the arrest of several mob members who were responsible for David’s death.

The family receives a call out of the blue from Angela. She finally managed to organise a raid on the brothel and got most of the girls out safely. Unfortunately, they were too late for Priscilla, who died after her terrible beating. Matola apologises for treating Chileshe badly, tells her she wants to come back home (she and Chileshe are from the same area) but has nowhere to go. She is also pregnant and HIV+.

Chileshe decides Matola can stay with her. Irene comes by with her newborn baby to ask Chola and Bwalya’s advice. She hasn’t heard from her husband, and wasn’t really clear on where exactly he was going. They tell her a bit about trafficking and what they learned in Joburg. Irene now realises that something bad may have happened to Jack.

Chola tells Chileshe that maybe she can work in a dress shop after all, and tells Chileshe about the money. Masautso tells Chileshe he is totally behind her, that he loves her no matter what has happened, and will do anything to help her. She tells him he can start by getting a bus ticket for Matola.


HopalangatanaIn order to acheive the best result, and to make sure that cultural references, local accents etc., were correct and included in the story, CMFD recorded Dealers and Troco on location in Zambia and Mozambique. We bought our mobile recording equipment and partnered with local studios for recording venues.

From 9 – 19 December 2007 CMFD travelled to Lusaka, ZambiaDealers. Recording was done at a local recording studio, Chilize Sounds Systems Corporation Limited, and involved an all-star cast including well-known radio personalities and television actors. The 10-day recording session, though intense, was a great experience for all of us. to record

After a short break for Christmas holidays, CMFD hit the road again in January 2008 to record Troco with the Hopangalatana Cultural Company. Recording took place at Uamba Studios in Maputo. The week-long session proved to be a great learning experience for group who, being stage actors, had to quickly adapt to the conventions and techniques of recording for radio.Cast

The casts

In Mozambique, CMFD worked with the Hopangalatana Cultural Company, a well-known Maputo-based theatre troupe that uses participatory theatre techniques to raise awareness of issues facing Mozambicans.

You can learn more about Hopangalatana's work by visiting their blog.

In Zambia, CMFD had the opportunity to work with some of the country's stars of screen, television and radio, including Mainza Chipenzi, Linah Zulu, Kangwa Chileshe and "Peaches" Mufungulwa.

Missing from this photo: Sunday Chanda, Nkhoma Masautso

The voices behind the theme songs

To record the musis for the theme songs, CMFD brought artists from Zambia and Maputo to our recording studio in Johannesburg. As with our actors, we had the opportunity to work with two very talented women who gave a haunting depth to the lyrics.

LilyLily Tembo (Aka) Lily. T. was born on 20 November 1981, in a small town called Kabwe in central province of Zambia. She did her primary in different schools and later her secondary school at Kabulongar Girls. She went to Verlyhone College of applied arts and trained as a journalist. She then went to pursue a degree in mass communication at Monash University. Lily have two albums to big credit, the first called Mvela (meaning listen) and the second being a self titled album. She has won several accolades for best videos, best female artist and best female performer. Lily is a goodwill ambassador for the United Nations on the Millennium Development Goals campaign; she is currently campaigning a goodwill project on malaria, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis.

Anita

 Anita Macuacua lives in Maputo, where she is an accomplished performer and recording artist.

The Scriptwriters

MerganMegan Godsell is a writer and a director for sirien film and radio. She graduated from Wits University in 2005 with a Ba Dramatic Arts. She currently runs her own theater and film production company. Mergan worked on the CMFD/ABC Ulwazi “Jabulani” project in 2004 as a scriptwriting workshop facilitator. She is in production with her short film Valentine and her play “why we left.”

NomaNomahlubi Mangele is a writer and an actor. She started acting when she was 15 years old. NomaHer interest is in social development. This was her first project with CMFD.

 

 

 

 

 


ZAMBIAN CAST BIOGRAPHIES

Cast members are listed in no particular order.

IN ZAMBIA

ChilesheKangwa Chileshe is a television and theatre actor and a model. He Played lead character in the Zambian soap opera“Kabanana”. He has done theatre acting in Dallas,Texas, for Christ for the Nation and has also featured in music videos.

Claudia Nkhata started drama at school. After graduation she joined the Lusaka theatre club as aClaudia freelance actress. Her biggest production was “Out of place”, followed by “Soweto” . She also featured in the “kitchen party”, “Chiti Muluba”, and did a TV advert for electoral commission of Zambia. Experiential Momentum and Mobi TV are other private organization she has worked with, among many others.

LinahLinah Zulu D is a young Zambian lady, working as a radio and TV presenter. She started exploring her talent in 2003 while working with UNICEF and the Zambian Civic Education Association (ZCEA). Linah loves to interact with people of different backgroundMasautsos so as to appreciate people.

Nkhoma Masautso is 22 years old completed high school in 2003. He is a hip-hop musician and has released two albums. Apart from being a musician he is an actor, and has acted in one of the Zambias biggest soap operas, “Kabanana.” He also features in a comedy called “Flat 6.”

SundaySunday Chanda studied law at UNZA, and went on to work with the Africa leadership development Institute in Pretoria, South Africa. He featured in the first drama piece in the Copper belt province, Ndola in particular, which focused on HIV/AIDS. In 2004 he worked on a script entitled “Zero transmission lifestyle” which was aired on Swazi TV in Swaziland

Mainza Chipenzi Started out as a keyboard player and back up vocalist for a band, beMainzacame lead singer for the group “Melt Down”, and chief producer at Mando Music. He later ventured into voice-over work for radio commercials like BP, Standard bank, Celtel etc. Mainza was recruited as an actor in the popular ZNBC soap “Kabanana”. Also appereared in the independent film “The Lawyer” as support actor opposite “Peaches”.he is currently working as a studio sound engineer/producer and singer, as well doing voices over work for radio commercials.

GiftGift Muneka has been in acting since 2000.She joined Zhaninga when she was still at school in 2000. She was introduced to the industry through the production “African Dream” by Comesa, later ventured into acting on a full time basis. Gift has done a couple of TV adverts and radio jingles. She is currently one of the main actors playing a lead role in the national television in Zambia. She won an award as best actress for Ngoma. For Gift acting is not just her passion but it is also part of her life and she always aims at reaching an international level.Kenneth

Kenneth Kalala is a new voice in Zambian radio. This was his first experience stepping behind the mic. He said although it was difficult at times, he would love to do it again.

MilnerChikandi Milner was born on the 11 of October 1987.She completed High school in 2003 and studied information technology and programming. Chikandi loves reading, cooking and watching movies; she also loves music and dancing.

Nalukui Mufungulwa was born on 29 June 1987 at Lwanohya General Hospital.StaNalukuirted acting at the age of 5 in school play. She was a member of the school drama club until her final senior year. Nalukui was also a member of music and debate clubs. She played lead role in the Zambian film industry and is currently working as a radio presenter at Qfm radio in Lusaka, Zambia. Nalukui loves acting, watching movies and is addicted to music.

LucyLucy Kalumbwa Chola Is a 20 year old woman who is a Christian by faith, and very enthusiastic.If she was asked to describe herself she would say she is friendly and social person. Lucy is right handed, enjoys hanging out and reading novels. Movies are her favorite past time. She also has a very active sense of humor.

IN SOUTH AFRICA

Catherine Mngawa was born on the 19 of September 1985. She is determined to contribute in making Africa a better place for everyone. She studied travel and tourism in Botswana. In the mean time she is working as a manager for a beauty parlor in South Africa. From the age of 16 Catherine had been an HIV facilitator, going to different places to acknowledge people about the dangers of AIDS. She love working with people with the same dreams as hers.

WezleeMasilo Wesley Makgamatha is an honours theatre and television student at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. He has worked on various stage, screen and radio productions as actor, director and producer. He has appeared in Wits Theatre productions including We shall sing for the fatherland (2005/2006), Translations (2007), and Stormpie (2007), as well as Six Nine (2007) for the Windybrow Theatre festival. He also wrote, directed and acted in the industrial theatre piece, The missing link (2006/2007).

Owas Ray Lwape was born 10 February 1973. He holds a bachelors degree in Owasbusiness administration and is currently general manager for Oram.Exp.marketing. Started acting from 1986 and won national best actor in 1990, ‘91, and ‘92.He became a TV presenter for Colgate Dynamo Take your Pick in 1998. He did video production analysis in 1999 in Nairobi.He aslo featured in TV soap “Kabanana”, the radio drama “we were heroes” in 2006 and also featured a film “The Lawyer” in 2007.

Bwalya Katongo

Three of our cast members in South Africa are not pictured here. They are:

Harrison Musumali  voiced the narration for the trailer and for the intro and extro for each episode.

Hlayisanani Salani, a Wits University radio presenter and honours student who played the rude South African police officer, the farm owner, and one of the men at the party.

Cindy Dzanya, CMFD's own multi-talented administrative/Projects assistant, who voiced one-liners in several scenes where we needed an extra body to make the setting sound just right.


 Trafficking Information

Human trafficking in Southern Africa
IOMposter.gifIn 2003, IOM's report, Seduction, Sale and Slavery: Trafficking in Women and Children for Sexual Exploitation in Southern Africa, identified Lesotho, Mozambique, Malawi, and a number of refugee-producing countries as key source countries for women and children trafficked to South Africa. With its history of southward migration flows, instability, porous borders, and weak institutions and structures, Southern Africa is fertile ground for irregular migration, and hosts a diverse range of migrant smuggling and human trafficking activities. The region's young women and children are especially vulnerable to the recruitment tactics of human traffickers because civil unrest and economic deprivation leave them with few opportunities at home, making migration to South Africa, the region's most prosperous country, a credible and appealing lure. Without appropriate language skills, a supportive social network, and laws and customs that she understands, the trafficked person feels isolated and disoriented, and it is this feeling of disorientation that makes her particularly vulnerable to exploitation. IOM has recognised that there is a need to raise awareness about human trafficking and issues that increase vulnerability of migrant women, to sexual abuse, and encourage people to take action.

Human trafficking is the third fastest growing and most lucrative criminal industry, after arms and drugs trafficking. It is thought that human trafficking makes about $7 – 9.5 billion annually. In addition, because many countries do not have adequate anti-trafficking laws, there is little risk of prosecution, so it continues to be a thriving business.

Traffickers typically recruit through false advertisements for jobs in anything from modelling to waitressing to domestic or agricultural work. They typically arrange passage into the destination country or city through both legal and illegal means. Often, the trafficked person knows his/her trafficker – they may be a friend, relative, neighbour or other acquaintance.

Looking for more information about human trafficking in Southern Africa ? Visitthe website of the IOM’s Southern African Counter-Trafficking Assistance Programme (SACTAP)

What is human trafficking?

Human trafficking can be defined as the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons, by means of the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, or abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of the giving or receiving of payments of benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation.

- The United Nations (UN) Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children

What are some situations people who are trafficked fall into?

  • Forced sex work (on the street, brothels, truck drivers)
  • Sexual slavery, sexual abuse and/ or rape
  • Disorientation and isolation
  • Unwanted pregnancy
  • Exploitation
  • Hard labour
  • Forced domestic and cheap labour
  • Physical and verbal abuse
  • Unsafe living/ working conditions
  • Work in illegal sweatshops
  • Language issues, not being able to understand
  • Abuse from support service, such as police, courts, social workers etc.
  • Not knowing their legal rights in a foreign country
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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